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The Morning Show Spotlights The Women Who Love The Men Who’re Outed

The Morning Show Spotlights The Women Who Love The Men Who’re Outed

the morning show

Three episodes into The Morning Show, and I have to say – even for me, someone who’s talked to many men and women in the wake of #MeToo , the show is a lesson in the 500 shades of grey the movement has unraveled.

Since my book came out, I’ve been asked several times by kind interviewers what men think about #MeToo. Each time, I say that the responses and opinions are along a spectrum from men having had an awakening to men feeling attacked and resentful.

I’d like to add one more thing here – I think it’s dangerous to try to have one definition of #MeToo. I also think it’s unfair to say that only men have things to learn from the movement. #MeToo is not one story. It’s an anthology, and not one only about sexual assault, but also about power.

There’s no one thing to gain from this anthology. Or to expect from it in terms of punishment for the accused, policy change and such. But if there was one thing that the movement has given all of us – of all genders – is a vocabulary to talk about our experiences. We’re all learning through the movement. Women too. We’re learning that the discomfort we may have felt in past sexual encounters has a name. But wait – what’s the opposite of consent?

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Perhaps #MeToo is better off being called ‘education’, not a movement, because the latter has a finality to it, and a way of fizzling out, while the former is an ongoing process with updated editions.

I also want to bring attention to the women in the lives of men who’ve been named as sexual predators during the #MeToo movement. Lovers, present and former; mothers, sisters, daughters, friends, colleagues – many of whom I imagine are feminists in their own regard, fighting their own battles against the patriarchy. What’s it like, I wonder, to be a woman who loves a man, in any capacity, who’s a sex offender in the public eye?

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